The Agile Practitioner: Workflow

In this Column, Tom talks about two topics that consistently come up in software development, but, he insists, they can most definitely apply to other product development processes as well: The amount of work in progress and the coupling/interdependency of components.

The Agile Practitioner: Agile Risk Management

Tom Bellinson describes how an agile team responds “when a deadline looms large.” Above all, product teams must have the freedom to deliver on the required outcomes for the customer in a highly flexible manner. An Agile team is trained for this purpose. Read more on this topic in Tom’s Column.

The Agile Practitioner: Business Process in an Agile Age

Tom cites a quote from The Agile Manifesto which states that the definition of Agile is “Individuals and interactions over processes and tools,” a phrase that he finds confusing. In this Column, he relates his efforts to uncover its meaning and shares his discovery with our readers.

The Agile Practitioner: The Importance of Trust

Tom’s role as a scrum master is to encourage practices that make the team more effective. Read why he considers trust an essential ingredient in accomplishing the goals if an “Agile” team.

The Agile Practitioner: Getting the Data

Tom Bellinson asserts that “To understand what is meant by “long-range planning,” we need to go back to the traditional approach to product planning.” In addition to gathering evidence, good product managers should also be directly interacting with users and associated product stakeholders.

The Agile Practitioner: Conflict is Scary

Tom Bellinson believes that conflict is scary, but he encourages risk-taking and change in the face of uncertainty. “Teams without a diversity of membership can fall into the group-think trap and become complacent.” Read his interesting take on the positive role conflict can play in leading to a successful outcome for the process team.

The Agile Practitioner: Striking a Balance–Meetings vs. Work

In this month’s Column, Tom urges practitioners to regularly evaluate what meetings are on their calendars and challenge their necessity. Meetings are, after all, time consuming and ultimately expensive in terms of sacrificing work time. He suggests a number of alternative communication methods and urges you to make sure that a meeting is the best option before choosing it.

The Agile Practitioner: Balancing Change

Tom Bellinson discusses lessons learned in a class he took to fulfill his scrum master certification training, “We must be willing to take bigger risks in the name of continuous improvement.” Read his compelling story drawn from Tom’s personal experience.

The Agile Practitioner: Agile Projects

Tom Bellinson states that “Agile project management is not an excuse to forego planning or architecture.” The fundamental flaw with the traditional approach to project management is that both the time permitted and the scope of work are fixed at the beginning. Read Tom’s Column to learn how an Agile approach can help overcome this problem.

The Agile Practitioner: The “Other” BPM

An attitude prevails in some organizations that too much business process management will stifle change, which is fundamental to being Agile. Tom Bellinson believes that trust is a very important characteristic of organizations that enjoy successful Agile practices. Read the examples he cites in support of his theory.

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