The Agile Practitioner: Agile Projects

Tom Bellinson states that “Agile project management is not an excuse to forego planning or architecture.” The fundamental flaw with the traditional approach to project management is that both the time permitted and the scope of work are fixed at the beginning. Read Tom’s Column to learn how an Agile approach can help overcome this problem.

The Agile Practitioner: The “Other” BPM

An attitude prevails in some organizations that too much business process management will stifle change, which is fundamental to being Agile. Tom Bellinson believes that trust is a very important characteristic of organizations that enjoy successful Agile practices. Read the examples he cites in support of his theory.

The Agile Practitioner: Stranded on Agile Island

Tom Bellinson’s experience as an Agile practitioner has led him to conclude that helping other teams become more Agile can ultimately increase trust throughout the organization and bring additional efficiencies to everyone. Read his Column for details.

The Agile Practitioner: Process, Dogma and Flexibility

Organizations that are serious about process management often use the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) as a means of evaluating their place on the maturity scale. Getting from Level 3 to Level 4 presents a considerable challenge to most organizations. And, although certain processes will always be managed at the organizational level, Tom believes agile practices are best left to the team level.

The Agile Practitioner: Using Agile Tools

For several years, BPTrends author, Tom Bellinson wrote a quarterly Column titled Process Solutions. This month he begins a new series for BPTrends entitled “The Agile Practitioner.” In his first Column in this series, Tom provides a detailed explanation of what agile processes do and how they can be applied.

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