Practical Process: Steepening the Curve

Referring to the Covid 19 Virus, Roger wonders if we could we invert and repurpose what we are learning from fighting the spread of the “bad” to encourage the spread of the “good?”. What can we learn from our responses to the current pandemic to improve our environment? Roger explores some possible answers in this month’s Column.

Practical Process: Umbrella Thinking

In seeking to better manage and improve business processes, we are often focused on elements of logistics and physical operation. Roger points out, however, that there are still many processes that require the involvement of people, i.e. human processes that are critical to overall performance. Roger suggests that we should incorporate human elements as well logistics into our process improvement efforts. In this Column, Roger reflects on an incident that occurred in London involving an abandoned umbrella to make his point.

Practical Process: Picturing Process

In his Column this month, Roger Tregear presents five pictures that he uses to explain process-based management. Process-based management is about how we work across the organization chart, not up and down it. What does working across the organization chart mean? Read why it matters in Roger’s Column.

Practical Process: Fair Dinkum Process Governance

Roger Tregear says that fair dinkum is an Australian slang expression meaning that “something is unquestionably good or genuine devoid of any actual or potential nonsense…” While much is written about process governance and the process owner (PO) role, much of it isn’t fair dinkum and doesn’t help a process owner understand what they are really supposed to do.

Practical Process: Measuring Business Process Performance

Roger Tregear claims that if we aren’t measuring process performance, we aren’t managing processes, and we can’t know if we are improving them. Process performance measurement is a vital enabler of process-based management.

Practical Process: BPM Myth or Method?

In talking to many people in many organizations in many places, Roger Tregear is frequently told things about BPM that are, from his perspective, just plain wrong. He refers to them as “process urban myths” and presents them here for your evaluation. Do you have any myths to add?

Practical Process: Processes Execute Strategy

Discovering strategy and documenting processes can be challenging. In this Column Roger Tregear illustrates a simple and practical approach to bring to life the connection between strategy and process.

Practical Process: The 6 wastes of BPM

Although we are very familiar with defining types of wastes that are found in operational activities, Roger Tregear asks “What about the wastes that we can too easily design into process-based management?” He believes that these wastes can result in the failure of active process management and improvement. In this Column, Roger defines some of those wastes and suggests countermeasures to eliminate them.

Practical Process: Process architecture vs the organization chart: no contest

Roger Tregear asserts that the process architecture and the organization chart are different and unrelated. One does not replace the other. They are not in competition. They are alternate views of the organization, and we need both. Read his well-reasoned argument explaining what these differences are and why.

Practical Process: A packet of seeds and a shovel is not gardening

This month Roger Tregear tackles the question of why few organizations create and sustain genuine process-based management. Roger believes that what’s missing is an embedded systemic approach that demonstrably delivers useful outcomes, i.e. it fixes problems and delivers improved performance. Read Roger’s analysis and the steps he proposes to overcome the obstacles to establishing a systemic approach.

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