Harmon on BPM: Recycling

Paul devotes his Column this month to the all-important topic of recycling. Business processes take inputs and convert them into valued outputs. However, the dirty secret is that while business processes take some inputs and convert them into valued outputs, most are, in fact, converted into waste bi-products that are simply thrown away. Read some thoughts on this important topic in Paul’s Column.

Performance Architecture: Upstairs Downstairs on the Edge

As Performance Architects, Roger Addison and Carol Haig are pleased to discover exceptional service which is usually enabled by customer-focused processes. These processes, combined with other factors produce a recipe for success. Read their take on the ingredients of the recipe.

Business Rules Solutions: The Problems Addressed by Business Rules Foreword to Business Rules: Management and Execution

In this Column, Ron Ross discusses rule independence. Read what that means and why it should be important to you .in a digital world where the pace of change is always accelerating. How to stay on top of it is the central question. Read what Ron has to say in response to that question.

The Agile Practitioner: Business Process in an Agile Age

Tom cites a quote from The Agile Manifesto which states that the definition of Agile is “Individuals and interactions over processes and tools,” a phrase that he finds confusing. In this Column, he relates his efforts to uncover its meaning and shares his discovery with our readers.

Harmon on BPM: Artificial Intelligence–Some Recent Developments

This month, Paul explores some recent developments in AI which he believes is the most popular technology today. To keep readers up to date, he decided to do a review featuring some recent announcements. Read further to learn more about what he learned.

Business Rules Solutions: Introducing Business Knowledge Blueprints: Achieving Shared Understanding Using Concept Models

A business knowledge blueprint, whose core component is a concept model, permits you to deeply analyze your concepts, your vocabulary, and your business knowledge. In this month’s Column, Ron explains all the critical reasons you need that blueprint.

Practical Process: Umbrella Thinking

In seeking to better manage and improve business processes, we are often focused on elements of logistics and physical operation. Roger points out, however, that there are still many processes that require the involvement of people, i.e. human processes that are critical to overall performance. Roger suggests that we should incorporate human elements as well logistics into our process improvement efforts. In this Column, Roger reflects on an incident that occurred in London involving an abandoned umbrella to make his point.

Digital Transformation: Economies of Learning

Enterprise economies and the nature of competition have changed over the last several years. In today’s business environment, leading companies are pursuing “economies of learning,”- the continual improvement, innovation and variation based on leveraging data and cognitive technologies to identify and fulfill changing needs for scale, scope, and engagement. So, what is the secret to turning data into value for the learning organization? Mike provides some viable answers to this question.

Harmon on BPM: Why Isn’t Process a First Class Concern to Business?

Paul recently came across several articles regarding changes being made to business school curricula to better prepare MBA students for today’s business environment. The articles addressed some specific changes to the programs but none of them talked about changing the fundamental content and none of them addressed the need for including BPM topics. In this column Paul asks Why Not?

Frameworks: How We Use Frameworks Matters

Effectiveness is a key measure of the impact and value of an organization’s process management team. Overall, organizations may be satisfied with their business process management (BPM) programs, however, given that continuous improvement is the name of the process management game, there is still plenty of room for growth. This leads to the question: What factors drive program effectiveness and what levers can teams pull for improvement? Read Holly’s Column for some insight into this question.

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