Human Processes: Collaboration = community

Keith suggests that third sector organizations which, as he defines them, include groups from the social/community/voluntary sector, need to become skilled at collaboration and are often led by highly networked individuals who mentor their colleagues to develop and use collaboration skills. Collaboration, he believes, is the lifeblood of this sector.

Human Processes: A Kiss from the Military

In this Column, Keith describes a little known but widely used approach to EA that emerges from the military called NAF (Nato architecture framework). Keith thinks of this framework as a way to keep it simple stupid (kiss). Read his Column for details.

Human Processes: Happy New Processes

To date, the focus of business process practitioners is on defining and then streamlining workplace activities. Keith Harrison-Broninski wonders if that will be the case in ten years. Read his Column to discover his thoughts on the future of business process. What do you think?

Human Processes: Measuring Change

In this Column, Keith Harrison-Broninski uses the Casual Loop Diagram as a starting point for measuring change. He provides a step by step method for aligning system dynamics with business processes. He has used this approach successfully in large-scale, multi-stakeholder environments. Keith would welcome your questions on how you might apply this approach in your organization.

Human Processes: We are all Politicians

Keith Harrison-Broninski returns to the subject of why meetings are often conducted so badly. This month Keith examines another aspect of meetings–the work required beforehand–which, if not attended to, can diminish chances for a successful outcome. Read his Column to learn what preparations made in advance of a critical meeting can lead to successful results.

Human Processes: We are All Consultants

In his last Column, Keith Harrison-Broninski argued for greater transparency in the decision-making processes used in the UK public sector. This month, he discusses the increasing involvement of members of the public in the UK public-sector decision-making processes. To illustrate his argument, he describes the activities of three initiatives designed to implement practical strategies for community-based action.

Human Processes: Unclear Resolutions

Keith Harrison Broninski discusses the recent floods in the North of England and describes how they could have been avoided had the UK government not made substantial cuts to its flood prevention programs. Keith examines the opaque collaborative decision-making process that does not always lead to maximum advantage for citizens and calls for more transparent processes in the public sector.

Human Processes: Turning Down the Heat of Collaboration

In his Column this month, Keith Harrison-Broninski discusses the secret to removing friction from workplace collaboration. He suggests that managers can eliminate friction by employing the 5 Cs—Commit, Contribute, Compensate, Calculate and Change to ensure that staff are not threatening each other’s workplace goals. Read Keith’s Column to see how the 5 Cs can help you and your organization.

Human Processes: Collaborate has 5 Cs.

Keith continues his discussion of collaboration begun in his June Column. This month he looks at the five principles of human collaborative work—(1) commit, (2) contribute, (3) compensate, (4) calculate, and (5) change—and discusses how each one is used in a collaborative plan.

Human Processes: Discovering Collaboration

Keith Harrison-Broninski elucidates the basic differences between collaborative and step by step processes. He explains why traditional analytical techniques fall short in analyzing collaborative processes and offers a few pointers on how to analyze collaborative processes.

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