Human Processes: Data Strategy

Keith premises this Column on the belief that processes and data are mirror images of one another. Processes not only consume and generate data, but are themselves a form of data, and governance processes are necessary to manage data generally. In this Column, Keith takes a look at the processes that control how data is created, used, updated, and disposed of by an organization.

Human Processes: Capabilities

Most Enterprise Architecture methodologies include the modeling of Capabilities. However, Keith suggests, it is not always clear what a Capability is, how to use it, and how it relates to other model elements such as Business Processes and Value Streams. Keith offers a brief analysis of how to approach Capabilities, explaining their fundamental connection with Human Processes.

Human Processes: Evolution of Indicators

Corporate indicators include Key Performance Indicators, Business Performance Indicators, and other metrics that form a basis for tracking an organization’s operations. Since these indicators respond to operational challenges that change constantly, improvement of data is often about improvement of indicators, which, according to Keith, makes it a human process. Read more on what this might mean for process practitioners in his Column.

Human Processes: The Hidden Teams Behind the Swim Lanes

“Processes don’t do work, teams do.” In this Column, Keith focuses on how to ensure
that the teams working on your processes are working effectively. He describes the three things which, he contends, can make a huge difference in accomplishing that goal and can be implemented inexpensively – 1) Hyper-productive teams, (2) Communities of Practice (CoPs), and (3) Center of Excellence (COE).

Human Processes: Creating a Network

In his Column this month, Keith summarizes two key ideas that evolved from research into the theory of Human Interaction Management. Keith believes these ideas to be particularly relevant and provides a set of five principles that help ensure productive collaboration.

Human Processes: What Makes Good Change?

In order to answer the question of what makes good process change, Keith suggests that it might be necessary to prioritize which processes you spend the most time on. But which of these processes should you select? Keith proposes possible criteria to select the best candidates.

Human Processes: What Makes a Good Process?

Respecting a long tradition in consultancy, Keith has organized his guide to process quality into 5’C;s, and he presents them in this month’s Column.

Human Processes: Too Many Cooks

This month, Keith takes a look back on how much has changed in the process handling of human work in the workplace in the ten years he’s been writing his Column. Read what his expectations were then and where we are in terms of the changes he anticipated process would bring to the business world.

Human Processes: Too Many Cooks

Keith Harrison-Broninski opines that in some organizations, it seems that everybody is creating processes. Large companies may have several change initiatives happening simultaneously, and the people involved don’t always realize that their colleagues are making new versions of the same or closely related processes. The only way to deal with this is at the enterprise level, and Keith offers some advice on how to do so.

Human Processes: The Rise of Humans

In his November Column, Keith discussed how collaborative processes are fundamental to initiatives in which the third sector (community and voluntary–the other two being public and private) plays a significant part, and how the importance of such initiatives is set to increase dramatically in years to come. In this Column, he discusses the impact of maturing automation technologies.

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