Human Processes: What Makes Good Change?

In order to answer the question of what makes good process change, Keith suggests that it might be necessary to prioritize which processes you spend the most time on. But which of these processes should you select? Keith proposes possible criteria to select the best candidates.

Human Processes: What Makes a Good Process?

Respecting a long tradition in consultancy, Keith has organized his guide to process quality into 5’C;s, and he presents them in this month’s Column.

Human Processes: Too Many Cooks

This month, Keith takes a look back on how much has changed in the process handling of human work in the workplace in the ten years he’s been writing his Column. Read what his expectations were then and where we are in terms of the changes he anticipated process would bring to the business world.

Human Processes: Too Many Cooks

Keith Harrison-Broninski opines that in some organizations, it seems that everybody is creating processes. Large companies may have several change initiatives happening simultaneously, and the people involved don’t always realize that their colleagues are making new versions of the same or closely related processes. The only way to deal with this is at the enterprise level, and Keith offers some advice on how to do so.

Human Processes: The Rise of Humans

In his November Column, Keith discussed how collaborative processes are fundamental to initiatives in which the third sector (community and voluntary–the other two being public and private) plays a significant part, and how the importance of such initiatives is set to increase dramatically in years to come. In this Column, he discusses the impact of maturing automation technologies.

Human Processes: Collaboration = community

Keith suggests that third sector organizations which, as he defines them, include groups from the social/community/voluntary sector, need to become skilled at collaboration and are often led by highly networked individuals who mentor their colleagues to develop and use collaboration skills. Collaboration, he believes, is the lifeblood of this sector.

Human Processes: A Kiss from the Military

In this Column, Keith describes a little known but widely used approach to EA that emerges from the military called NAF (Nato architecture framework). Keith thinks of this framework as a way to keep it simple stupid (kiss). Read his Column for details.

Human Processes: Happy New Processes

To date, the focus of business process practitioners is on defining and then streamlining workplace activities. Keith Harrison-Broninski wonders if that will be the case in ten years. Read his Column to discover his thoughts on the future of business process. What do you think?

Human Processes: Measuring Change

In this Column, Keith Harrison-Broninski uses the Casual Loop Diagram as a starting point for measuring change. He provides a step by step method for aligning system dynamics with business processes. He has used this approach successfully in large-scale, multi-stakeholder environments. Keith would welcome your questions on how you might apply this approach in your organization.

Human Processes: We are all Politicians

Keith Harrison-Broninski returns to the subject of why meetings are often conducted so badly. This month Keith examines another aspect of meetings–the work required beforehand–which, if not attended to, can diminish chances for a successful outcome. Read his Column to learn what preparations made in advance of a critical meeting can lead to successful results.

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