Harmon on BPM

Paul Harmon’s monthly Editorial, Harmon on BPM is posted in chronological order, beginning with the most recent posting.

Harmon on BPM: Industry Studies

While technology trend studies are useful, Paul thinks today’s most interesting trend is “Industry Studies.” He observes that a growing number of reports are being written that describe how companies within a given industry are likely to change. Because these studies are focused on specific industries, they are especially useful to the executives within those specific industries. Read his Column for details.

Harmon on BPM: Teaching Employees about Process

Based on his lengthy experience in working with organizations, Paul is absolutely convinced that managers and employees need to understand processes. They need to know that the activities they work on are a part of the larger set of activities that constitute a process, and they need to know that these processes will show how work gets done in their organizations.

Harmon on BPM: Then and Now: The Impact of Change on Organizations

Times have changed dramatically since the 1980’s when organizations could establish and maintain their product lines and market position for decades. Today, even the largest and most successful companies find their product lines popular for a few years and then find themselves scrambling to replace them with the next new thing. Paul concludes that jobs that support facilitation of change are the safest jobs in today’s business environment.

Harmon on BPM: Defining Problems for Critical Processes

In his December Column, Paul cited two key tools that agile process developers needed to know. One is the Stakeholder Diagram which he discussed in that Column. The other is the Scope Diagram, a tool that refines our understanding of a process and identifies problems that we might want to alter or improve. In this Column, Paul focuses on the Scope Diagram.

Harmon on BPM: Establishing Objectives for Agile Process

In the November Poll, we asked our readers to tell us what percent of their processes were well documented, modeled and routinely measured. The results revealed a considerable discrepancy between interest and application. In this Column, Paul presents the Stakeholder Diagram as a tool to simplify an agile process redesign.

Harmon on BPM: Wil van der Aalst and a New BPM Program

Hearing the news that Wil van der Aalst had been asked to create a new Process and Data Science group at Aachen University in Germany, Paul contacted him to ask him about his new undertaking. His Column this month features Dr. van der Aalst’s responses.

Harmon on BPM: Toward an Agile BPM Methodology, Part 1, Identifying Problems

The Agile approach opposes the formal process methodologies that put more emphasis on developing an architecture and surveying an organization. The main driver for this change is the growing role that transformative technologies are playing in our organizations. In this first Column on an agile BPM approach, Paul addresses one issue: identifying the opportunity to be addressed by the new technology.

Harmon on BPM: Business Process Conferences

In this Column, Paul discusses the decline in Conferences focused on BPM which he attributes to the idea that “we are currently in a lull, waiting for some new development to put fresh wind in the process sails.” He provides commentary on the fall 2017 conferences and looks forward with great enthusiasm to spring 2018 conferences.

Harmon on BPM: Toward an Agile BPM Methodology

Paul predicts that every company is going to be engaged in constant redesign and transformation within the next few years. He suggests that business change practitioners need an agile methodology to accommodate the ongoing need for change. Let us know your thoughts on Paul’s predictions.

Harmon on BPM: Robotic Process Automation Comes of Age

The need for Robotic Process Automation occurs when employees routinely need to work with two or more existing applications and transfer data between them. Read Paul’s Column on why RPA is increasingly becoming a solution to consider.

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