Human Processes: Collaboration at a Distance

Keith was surprised when the forced confinement of the pandemic caused him to rethink the idea that consultants, writers and speakers needed an initial face to face contact with clients.in order to establish a good working relationship. What changed his thinking?

ESSENTIALS OF BUSINESS ARCHITECTURE: Freedom Within a Framework

In earlier Columns, Roger has stressed the value of sound business architecture to the performance of the organization. In this Column, he urges practitioners not to treat the architecture as a “cookbook.” Read his useful advice on what and what not to do in implementing the elements of a business architecture.

Harmon on BPM: Managing Ongoing Processes

When most process practitioners think of business process work, they think of redesigning or improving processes. In fact, all processes have two phases. Phase I is the state of the current process, and Phase II is the redesign of the Phase I process to improve performance. Read Paul’s Column to understand the significance of Phase I and why practitioners need to have a thorough knowledge of the issues involved.

Business Rule Solutions: Empowering People with Core Business Knowledge: Concept Models

Frequently overlooked are the challenges of bringing new people in new roles up-to-speed on the business knowledge of the company and the vocabulary used to communicate that business strategy. Ron Ross applies his experience and expertise to demonstrate how you can overcome those challenges and enable new workers to achieve high levels of knowledge productivity in as short a time as possible, using a concept model.

The Agile Practitioner: Agile Documentation

Tom Bellinson advises against standardization. If there’s one takeaway here, it is this: don’t standardize on one or two tools and force everyone to use them for their solution. Allow people to find the tools that fit their particular needs. This practice, he believes will result in a more productive staff and better outcomes that will more than justify the cost of the extra tools.

Practical Process: Activating process-based management

Roger Tregear’s Column talks about why Process-based Management is a continuous cycle, driven by a well-defined target performance profile and shaped by continuous performance analysis – not just about isolated process-improvement projects. When we activate process-based management we take the idea of genuine continuous improvement seriously. Read details of how you can achieve continuous improvement in your organization and the benefits that will accrue.

Harmon on BPM: Process Improvement at a Casino

Paul recently received a solicitation for a Process Management job at a casino. He read the job description, and then considered how he might approach the opportunity. Read his thoughts on how he would prepare for the proposal and what process activities he would emphasize.

Performance Architecture: The Case of the Moving Building

Roger Addison, Carol Haig and their guest author, Mark Johnson, relate the true story of a building where unwanted movement was occurring. The building’s owner brought in a forensics team that specialized in architecture, engineering, and construction to help determine the root cause of the movement. Read what the forensics team concluded.

Practical Process: Signals in the Noise

In this Column, Roger (re)introduces what he considers to be the most important process performance management tool ever invented – the Process Behavior Chart (PBC), aka the XmR Chart. According to Roger, “Using a PBC allows us to focus on what is important and avoid chasing shadows.” Read how you can use the chart in your BPM practice.

Harmon on BPM: Brett Champlin and the ABPMP

Paul eulogizes Brett Champlin and enumerates his many contributions to establishing the Association of Business Process Management Professionals as the respected BPM professional organization it is today.

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