The Agile Practitioner: Agile Projects

Tom Bellinson states that “Agile project management is not an excuse to forego planning or architecture.” The fundamental flaw with the traditional approach to project management is that both the time permitted and the scope of work are fixed at the beginning. Read Tom’s Column to learn how an Agile approach can help overcome this problem.

Harmon on BPM: Elon Musk on Productivity

Simply stated, Tesla is having trouble reaching its goal of 6,000 units per week at its Fremont plant. When the Model 3 was first announced, Musk said that the Fremont plant would use radically improved technology to make its production the most efficient in the world. That’s quite a challenge. Read Paul’s analysis of where Tesla is now and what innovations they might come up with to achieve their production goals.

Process Improvement: When Clients Act like Jerks

Alan Ramias takes on an issue that BPM practitioners frequently encounter–how to handle bad behaving .clients. After a long career as a performance consultant, Alan has collected a virtual anthology of how to handle misbehaving clients and bosses, and he shares them here.

Performance Architecture: Evaluation – Begin at the End

In this month’s Column, Roger Addison and Carol Haig offer what some might consider unusual advice for developing and implementing a project—start your evaluation at the end and work backwards. Don’t reject it until you’ve tried it.

Business Rules Solutions: Concept Models vs. Data Models

Ron Ross defines what a concept model is, and suggests that to appreciate the need for a concept model, you must appreciate that business communication is often replete with ambiguity.”If you’ve never been burned by miscommunication, then you’ll never really appreciate the need for a concept model.” But, as Ron says, of course we’ve all been victimized in that respect. Read his advice on how to avoid ambiguity that could lead to miscommunication.

Human Processes: Too Many Cooks

This month, Keith takes a look back on how much has changed in the process handling of human work in the workplace in the ten years he’s been writing his Column. Read what his expectations were then and where we are in terms of the changes he anticipated process would bring to the business world.

Harmon on BPM: Trouble at Starbucks

Paul opines that a good process analyst must be the master of a number of different disciplines, including defining flows, identifying decision points, and determining the effects of defective environments, people or technologies that are integral to the operations of the organization. This month, Paul focuses on people problems such as those recently experienced at Starbucks – specifically, on thinking clearly about what’s involved in getting human performers to properly apply the company policies appropriately to the situations at hand.

Harmon on BPM: Industry Studies

While technology trend studies are useful, Paul thinks today’s most interesting trend is “Industry Studies.” He observes that a growing number of reports are being written that describe how companies within a given industry are likely to change. Because these studies are focused on specific industries, they are especially useful to the executives within those specific industries. Read his Column for details.

Class Notes: Blockchain & Business Process Management. Part 1 the BPM Lifecycle

In this Column, Jan vom Brocke and his colleagues Jan Mendling and Ingo Weber report on recent research in the area of Blockchain and Business Process Management. Based on their report, the authors have provided recommendations for organizations wishing to capitalize on the new technology in each of the six lifecycle phases.

The Agile Practitioner: The “Other” BPM

An attitude prevails in some organizations that too much business process management will stifle change, which is fundamental to being Agile. Tom Bellinson believes that trust is a very important characteristic of organizations that enjoy successful Agile practices. Read the examples he cites in support of his theory.

Share
Share