Roger Tregear

Roger TregearAs the Principal Advisor with TregearBPM (www.tregearbpm.com), Roger Tregear delivers BPM courses and consulting assignments around the world. Roger spends his working life talking, consulting, thinking, and writing about analysis, improvement, innovation, and management of business processes. His work with clients is in organizational performance improvement and problem solving based on BPM capability development, and business process, analysis, improvement, and management. He helps small and large organizations understand the potential, and realize the practical benefits, of process-based management. Roger is the author of the book Reimagining Management. Contact Roger on +61 (0)419 220 280 or at roger@tregearbpm.com.


Practical Process: Fair Dinkum Process Governance

Roger Tregear says that fair dinkum is an Australian slang expression meaning that “something is unquestionably good or genuine devoid of any actual or potential nonsense…” While much is written about process governance and the process owner (PO) role, much of it isn’t fair dinkum and doesn’t help a process owner understand what they are really supposed to do.

Practical Process: Measuring Business Process Performance

Roger Tregear claims that if we aren’t measuring process performance, we aren’t managing processes, and we can’t know if we are improving them. Process performance measurement is a vital enabler of process-based management.

Practical Process: BPM Myth or Method?

In talking to many people in many organizations in many places, Roger Tregear is frequently told things about BPM that are, from his perspective, just plain wrong. He refers to them as “process urban myths” and presents them here for your evaluation. Do you have any myths to add?

Practical Process: Processes Execute Strategy

Discovering strategy and documenting processes can be challenging. In this Column Roger Tregear illustrates a simple and practical approach to bring to life the connection between strategy and process.

Practical Process: The 6 wastes of BPM

Although we are very familiar with defining types of wastes that are found in operational activities, Roger Tregear asks “What about the wastes that we can too easily design into process-based management?” He believes that these wastes can result in the failure of active process management and improvement. In this Column, Roger defines some of those wastes and suggests countermeasures to eliminate them.

Practical Process: Process architecture vs the organization chart: no contest

Roger Tregear asserts that the process architecture and the organization chart are different and unrelated. One does not replace the other. They are not in competition. They are alternate views of the organization, and we need both. Read his well-reasoned argument explaining what these differences are and why.

Practical Process: A packet of seeds and a shovel is not gardening

This month Roger Tregear tackles the question of why few organizations create and sustain genuine process-based management. Roger believes that what’s missing is an embedded systemic approach that demonstrably delivers useful outcomes, i.e. it fixes problems and delivers improved performance. Read Roger’s analysis and the steps he proposes to overcome the obstacles to establishing a systemic approach.

Practical Process: Lost-baggage processes

Roger Tregear asks, “Is your organization investing in lost-baggage processes?” His observation is that organizations often invest a lot of time and money in improving the wrong processes. Instead of fixing the resulting lost-baggage processes, Roger urges us to fix the processes that cause the baggage to be lost in the first place.

Practical Process: Delivering artifacts, not value?

Roger Tregear asserts that it proves to be easy for those closely involved in the theory and practice of process-based management to confuse the delivery of nicely crafted artifacts with delivering real value. In his Column this month he provides a sequence of questions for analysis that will help you avoid that problem

Practical Process: All in the Mind

Roger Tregear considers an organizational “process mind set” an essential ingredient for successfully maintaining processes. In this Column he defines the characteristics of such a mindset and offers suggestions for achieving it in your organization.

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