Keith Harrison-Broninski

Keith Harrison-BroninskiKeith Harrison-Broninski FRSA is an author, speaker, and technology/business consultant specialising in collaboration across organisational boundaries as well as social technology for wellness, community, and finance. Keith's first book was "Human Interactions" (2005):

  • "Set to produce the first fundamental advances in personal productivity since the arrival of the spreadsheet" (Information Age)
  • "The breakthrough that changes the rules of business" (Peter Fingar, author of "Business Process Management: The Third Wave")
  • "The overarching framework for 21st century business technology" (BP Trends)
  • "The next logical step in process-based technology" (Chair of the Workflow Management Coalition)

Keith went on to develop these principles for cross-boundary collaboration in further books and research and lead award-winning social enterprises for healthcare innovation, wellness, and community finance.

Keith's latest book "Supercommunities" brings together insights from recent academic research with original ideas about wellness, collaboration, and finance to explain how communities everywhere can become antifragile through social trading.


Human Processes: Creating a Network

In his Column this month, Keith summarizes two key ideas that evolved from research into the theory of Human Interaction Management. Keith believes these ideas to be particularly relevant and provides a set of five principles that help ensure productive collaboration.

Human Processes: What Makes Good Change?

In order to answer the question of what makes good process change, Keith suggests that it might be necessary to prioritize which processes you spend the most time on. But which of these processes should you select? Keith proposes possible criteria to select the best candidates.

Human Processes: What Makes a Good Process?

Respecting a long tradition in consultancy, Keith has organized his guide to process quality into 5’C;s, and he presents them in this month’s Column.

Human Processes: Too Many Cooks

This month, Keith takes a look back on how much has changed in the process handling of human work in the workplace in the ten years he’s been writing his Column. Read what his expectations were then and where we are in terms of the changes he anticipated process would bring to the business world.

Human Processes: Too Many Cooks

Keith Harrison-Broninski opines that in some organizations, it seems that everybody is creating processes. Large companies may have several change initiatives happening simultaneously, and the people involved don’t always realize that their colleagues are making new versions of the same or closely related processes. The only way to deal with this is at the enterprise level, and Keith offers some advice on how to do so.

Human Processes: The Rise of Humans

In his November Column, Keith discussed how collaborative processes are fundamental to initiatives in which the third sector (community and voluntary–the other two being public and private) plays a significant part, and how the importance of such initiatives is set to increase dramatically in years to come. In this Column, he discusses the impact of maturing automation technologies.

Human Processes: Collaboration = community

Keith suggests that third sector organizations which, as he defines them, include groups from the social/community/voluntary sector, need to become skilled at collaboration and are often led by highly networked individuals who mentor their colleagues to develop and use collaboration skills. Collaboration, he believes, is the lifeblood of this sector.

Human Processes: A Kiss from the Military

In this Column, Keith describes a little known but widely used approach to EA that emerges from the military called NAF (Nato architecture framework). Keith thinks of this framework as a way to keep it simple stupid (kiss). Read his Column for details.

Human Processes: Happy New Processes

To date, the focus of business process practitioners is on defining and then streamlining workplace activities. Keith Harrison-Broninski wonders if that will be the case in ten years. Read his Column to discover his thoughts on the future of business process. What do you think?

Human Resources: Human Data

In this Column, Keith examines the key aspects of data to see how they relate to human processes. He presents a new model for analysis that makes explicit the connection of data to human processes. Keith’s model not only clarifies how data differs from the uses to which it is put, but also explains the human processes required to collect data and do something useful with it.

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