Keith Harrison-Broninski

Keith Harrison-BroninskiKeith Harrison-Broninski FRSA is an author, speaker, and technology/business consultant specialising in collaboration across organisational boundaries as well as social technology for wellness, community, and finance. Keith's first book was "Human Interactions" (2005):

  • "Set to produce the first fundamental advances in personal productivity since the arrival of the spreadsheet" (Information Age)
  • "The breakthrough that changes the rules of business" (Peter Fingar, author of "Business Process Management: The Third Wave")
  • "The overarching framework for 21st century business technology" (BP Trends)
  • "The next logical step in process-based technology" (Chair of the Workflow Management Coalition)

Keith went on to develop these principles for cross-boundary collaboration in further books and research and lead award-winning social enterprises for healthcare innovation, wellness, and community finance.

Keith's latest book "Supercommunities" brings together insights from recent academic research with original ideas about wellness, collaboration, and finance to explain how communities everywhere can become antifragile through social trading.


Human Processes: Me, We

In this month’s Column, Keith looks at past and present efforts to define and deliver outcomes that achieve more than just profits. He shares the knowledge he has accrued through his experience in working with organizations to improve their business environment beyond increasing profits.

Human Processes: There’s No Such Thing as Good Tech

Keith believes that we are at a critical point in technology development—”poised for either utopia or dystopia”, depending on choices made by IT thought leaders over the next few years. Process people, as key adopters of new technologies, have some influence over these choices. Read how you might wield more influence on future technologies.

Human Processes: Collaboration at a Distance

Keith was surprised when the forced confinement of the pandemic caused him to rethink the idea that consultants, writers and speakers needed an initial face to face contact with clients.in order to establish a good working relationship. What changed his thinking?

Human Processes: Data Strategy

Keith premises this Column on the belief that processes and data are mirror images of one another. Processes not only consume and generate data, but are themselves a form of data, and governance processes are necessary to manage data generally. In this Column, Keith takes a look at the processes that control how data is created, used, updated, and disposed of by an organization.

Human Processes: Capabilities

Most Enterprise Architecture methodologies include the modeling of Capabilities. However, Keith suggests, it is not always clear what a Capability is, how to use it, and how it relates to other model elements such as Business Processes and Value Streams. Keith offers a brief analysis of how to approach Capabilities, explaining their fundamental connection with Human Processes.

Human Processes: Evolution of Indicators

Corporate indicators include Key Performance Indicators, Business Performance Indicators, and other metrics that form a basis for tracking an organization’s operations. Since these indicators respond to operational challenges that change constantly, improvement of data is often about improvement of indicators, which, according to Keith, makes it a human process. Read more on what this might mean for process practitioners in his Column.

Human Processes: The Hidden Teams Behind the Swim Lanes

“Processes don’t do work, teams do.” In this Column, Keith focuses on how to ensure
that the teams working on your processes are working effectively. He describes the three things which, he contends, can make a huge difference in accomplishing that goal and can be implemented inexpensively – 1) Hyper-productive teams, (2) Communities of Practice (CoPs), and (3) Center of Excellence (COE).

Human Processes: Creating a Network

In his Column this month, Keith summarizes two key ideas that evolved from research into the theory of Human Interaction Management. Keith believes these ideas to be particularly relevant and provides a set of five principles that help ensure productive collaboration.

Human Processes: What Makes Good Change?

In order to answer the question of what makes good process change, Keith suggests that it might be necessary to prioritize which processes you spend the most time on. But which of these processes should you select? Keith proposes possible criteria to select the best candidates.

Human Processes: What Makes a Good Process?

Respecting a long tradition in consultancy, Keith has organized his guide to process quality into 5’C;s, and he presents them in this month’s Column.

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