Business Architecture

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When IT theorists first began to describe architectures for organizations, they referred to the entire architecture of an organization as an Enterprise Architecture. Within that overall architecture, they assumed there were subsidiary architectures. There was, for example, a business architecture that described what the business was trying to do, and there was an IT architecture that described what IT was trying to do. Within the IT architecture there was usually an applications architecture, a database architecture, an infrastructure architecture, and so forth. Over the course of time, since it was usually IT people who created “Enterprise Architectures,” they formulated the business architecture in a way that supported the concerns of IT.

Separately, there have always been business process theorists, who have sought to conceptualize the business architecture in terms of business processes, and they are, in effect, rivals seeking to control the definition of a business architecture. Most process theorists assume that business people ought to define the business architecture, using processes as the core element. See Business Process Architecture, below.

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