Harmon on BPM

Paul Harmon’s monthly Editorial, Harmon on BPM is posted in chronological order, beginning with the most recent posting.

Harmon on BPM: Sustainable Business Processes

In a world in which water and energy are becoming increasingly more expensive, and the negative effects of industrial processes and waste disposal are increasingly scrutinized, efforts at sustainable waste processing processes are going to be increasingly necessary. Read Paul’s Column for an account of his recent visits to companies where sustainable waste processing has become a major priority.

Harmon on BPM: Where is BPM Today?

In his Column this month, Paul highlights the development of BPM from 2003 to the present. While the focus on BPM may appear to have declined a bit, Paul observes that it has morphed into something more complex, but no less important… Today, leading companies are working to automate more complex cognitive processes – an effort that will continue to be a challenge over the course of the next few decades.

Harmon on BPM: Fixing Little Things

Organizations need to constantly work on updating and improving their basic processes by identifying not only major problems but also the hundreds of small tasks and activities which, if not attended to, can lead to serious problems. Paul believes that teams of engaged and process aware employees can contribute to an organization’s excellence by identifying all problems, large and small.

Industry 4.0

This month Paul Harmon examines the components of Industry 4.0, a term used to define the current trends in the computerization of manufacturing. The common element among these trends is a reliance on the Internet of Things. Read Paul’s Column to learn more about Industry 4.0 and how it might affect your organization.

Harmon on BPM: The BPTrends BPM Market Survey

Paul Harmon’s Column this month discusses the 2016 BPTrends BPM Market Survey, first published in 2006 and, published every other year since. In addition to comprehensive reporting of the data from the most recent survey, the 2016 Survey provides comparisons of the data from all six surveys. We hope you will take time to read the results.

Harmon on BPM: The Digital Transformation and Business Process

Paul Harmon believes the current digital transformation is ultimately a business process transformation and that the challenge organizations face is not what to automate, but what to automate first. Read his insights into the Digital Transformation movement and its impact on business processes.

Harmon on BPM: Business Process Trends in 2016

This month, Paul presents his thoughts on what we might expect to see occur in process work in 2016. Based on responses to our January reader’s poll, observations at the November Building Business Capability Conference and extensive market research, he speculates that it will be a slow to average year for those promoting BPM, but will see the emergence of Cognitive Computing as an important technology. Read Paul’s Column for his take on 2016 and what Cognitive Computing might mean for BPM.

Harmon on BPM: Business Process and Case Modeling

Business process change projects almost always involve the development of some kind of modeling diagrams. In this Column, Paul Harmon focuses on Case Management Modeling as applied by business managers and IT practitioners and discusses the differences between their approaches to the methodology.

Harmon on BPM: Business Analysis and Business Process Management

At the recent Building Business Capabilities Conference the question of the differences between a Business Process Practitioner and a Business Analyst was frequently asked. In this month’s Column, Paul presents his view on their differences and similarities as well as their respective roles in process initiatives.

Harmon on BPM: Business Process Management Today

While preparing for the Building Business Capability Conference, Paul began thinking about the differences in BPM now and when he first started working in the field in the late 60’s. In this Column, he provides a brief summary of the state of BPM that motivated managers to pursue a process approach over the following several decades. Paul concludes that, unlike those previous decades, these days, new techniques will be less important than”good, clear thinking about how work gets done.”