Paul Harmon

Executive Editor and Founder, Business Process Trends

Paul HarmonIn addition to his role as Executive Editor and Founder of Business Process Trends, Paul Harmon is Chief Consultant and Founder of Enterprise Alignment, a professional services company providing educational and consulting services to managers interested in understanding and implementing business process change.

Paul is a noted consultant, author and analyst concerned with applying new technologies to real-world business problems. He is the author of Business Process Change: A Manager's Guide to Improving, Redesigning, and Automating Processes (2003). He has previously co-authored Developing E-business Systems and Architectures (2001), Understanding UML (1998), and Intelligent Software Systems Development (1993). Mr. Harmon has served as a senior consultant and head of Cutter Consortium's Distributed Architecture practice. Between 1985 and 2000 Mr. Harmon wrote Cutter newsletters, including Expert Systems Strategies, CASE Strategies, and Component Development Strategies.

Paul has worked on major process redesign projects with Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Security Pacific, Prudential, and Citibank, among others. He is a member of ISPI and a Certified Performance Technologist. Paul is a widely respected keynote speaker and has developed and delivered workshops and seminars on a wide variety of topics to conferences and major corporations through out the world.

Paul lives in San Francisco.

Paul can be reached at pharmon@bptrends.com


Harmon on BPM: Toward an Agile BPM Methodology

Paul predicts that every company is going to be engaged in constant redesign and transformation within the next few years. He suggests that business change practitioners need an agile methodology to accommodate the ongoing need for change. Let us know your thoughts on Paul’s predictions.

Harmon on BPM: Robotic Process Automation Comes of Age

The need for Robotic Process Automation occurs when employees routinely need to work with two or more existing applications and transfer data between them. Read Paul’s Column on why RPA is increasingly becoming a solution to consider.

Harmon on BPM: Value Chains vs. Ecosystems

Paul reflects on what Michael Porter meant when he described a value chain in 1985 and compares it to how the definition has changed over the years using Amazon and Uber as contemporary examples.

Harmon on BPM: Business Process Architectures

Paul Harmon says that “Words decay with use.” In his Column this month he explores the various definitions of Business Architecture that have evolved over the years.

Harmon on BPM: Two Types of Digital Transformation

This month Paul continues his discussion of Digital Transformation. In this Column, Paul draws a distinction between Digital Transformations that are, in fact, redesigns, and those that really involve creating a new process from scratch.

Book Review: Process Based Approach to Operational Risk Management

This month Paul reviews Process Based Approach to Operational Risk Management by Kannan Subramanian.

Harmon on BPM: Digital Transformation

In this Column, Paul discusses the impact of the digital transformation on BPM. He urges business process analysts and developers to rethink how their organizations’ work and to develop the new kinds of digital systems and infrastructure needed to survive in the near future.

A Book Review: Workflow Patterns: The Definitive Guide

This month Paul Harmon reviews Workflow Patterns—The Definitive Guide by Nick Russell, Wil M.P.van der Aalst and Arthur H.M. ter Hofstede.

Harmon on BPM: What Comes Next?

In his first Column of the New Year, Paul speculates on what changes might be in store for Business Process Management in 2017. Do you agree or disagree with his projections? We hope you will share your thoughts on the subject.

Book Review: Real World Decision Modeling With DMN By James Taylor & Jan Purchase

This month, Paul Harmon reviews Real World Decision Modeling with DMN by James Taylor and Jan Purchase. Paul posed a series of questions to the authors concerning DMN (Decision Modeling Notation) and based his review of the book on their responses.

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