An Update on the BPTrends July Mini Poll

I commented earlier on the July poll, but want to take a moment to review it at the end of the month.   The results are as follows:

 Who does BPM at your organization and what are their goals. (You can choose more than one.)

 —  BPM is done by our IT people and their goal is to automate specific subprocesses.     (38%, 11 Votes)

—   BPM is done by our IT people (process analysts or simply software developers) and their goal is to improve specific processes using all means necessary.     (31%, 9 Votes)

—  BPM is done by business analysts. Their goal is to define requirements that IT can use to automate a subprocess.     (41%, 12 Votes)

—   BPM is done by business analysts. Their goal is to improve or fix specific processes and they use all means necessary.      (55%, 16 Votes)

—  BPM is done by a business rules group. Their goal is to improve the quality of decisions within a given process.     (7%, 2 Votes)

—  BPM is done by our Lean or Six Sigma people. Their goal is to improve the efficiency or effectiveness of a given process.     (38%, 11 Votes)

—  BPM is done by employees working on a specific process. Our sales people are working to incrementally improve our sales process.     (48%, 14 Votes)

—  BPM is done by middle managers. Their goal is to fix a specific problem or process – e.g. to get our sales process to be as cost-effective as the competition.     (34%, 10 Votes)

—  BPM is done by business executives. Their goal is to fix a specific problem or process – e.g. to get our sales process to be as cost-effective as the competition.     (21%, 6 Votes)

—  BPM is done by business executives. Their goal is to achieve better organization performance.     (38%, 11 Votes)

Total Voters: 29

As I noted in my earlier post, although statistically insignificant — too few people responded — the result never-the-less is largely in line with the fall BPTrends Survey which had a large number of respondents from around the world.  The broadest conclusion is that there are lots of people doing process work from a variety of different traditions.  At any given organization, process change work is as likely to be undertaken by an IT process team, by a business analyst group, by employees who work on the process in question, or by a Lean or Six Sigma team, or by by middle managers or business executives.

 This makes it hard for even the best organized group to know how best to approach a given problem, and makes it very difficult for outsiders, who want to talk about process change, to know how to address within an organization.

 

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