Search Results for: broninski

Human Processes: Harrison-Broninski’s Second Law

Human Processes: Harrison-Broninski’s Second Law What, you may wonder is Harrison-Broninski”s Second Law. Put simply, it evolves from the premise that we are in the “6th distinct period of computing”—one in which social media make it possible to create your own digital, virtual identity. The ramifications, Keith asserts, will have a profound impact on Information […]

February 2017

Dear BPTrends Member: Digital transformation and its impact on BPM is very much on the minds of our authors this month. Paul Harmon and Keith Harrison-Broninski weigh in on the subject in their respective Columns. Leandro Jesus and Michael Rosemann of Queensland University of Technology share their thoughts on the future of BPM in their […]

Human Processes: Happy New Processes

To date, the focus of business process practitioners is on defining and then streamlining workplace activities. Keith Harrison-Broninski wonders if that will be the case in ten years. Read his Column to discover his thoughts on the future of business process. What do you think?

Human Resources: Human Data

In this Column, Keith examines the key aspects of data to see how they relate to human processes. He presents a new model for analysis that makes explicit the connection of data to human processes. Keith’s model not only clarifies how data differs from the uses to which it is put, but also explains the human processes required to collect data and do something useful with it.

September 2016

Dear BPTrends Member: Returning to our regular monthly presentation of new content after the “best of” issue in August, this month we bring our readers an array of thought-provoking Columns and Articles that we hope will offer new and useful perspectives on Business Process Management. Paul Harmon and Sasha Aganova focus on sustainable processes, while […]

Human Processes: Measuring Change

In this Column, Keith Harrison-Broninski uses the Casual Loop Diagram as a starting point for measuring change. He provides a step by step method for aligning system dynamics with business processes. He has used this approach successfully in large-scale, multi-stakeholder environments. Keith would welcome your questions on how you might apply this approach in your organization.

Human Processes: We are all Politicians

Keith Harrison-Broninski returns to the subject of why meetings are often conducted so badly. This month Keith examines another aspect of meetings–the work required beforehand–which, if not attended to, can diminish chances for a successful outcome. Read his Column to learn what preparations made in advance of a critical meeting can lead to successful results.

Human Processes: We are All Consultants

In his last Column, Keith Harrison-Broninski argued for greater transparency in the decision-making processes used in the UK public sector. This month, he discusses the increasing involvement of members of the public in the UK public-sector decision-making processes. To illustrate his argument, he describes the activities of three initiatives designed to implement practical strategies for community-based action.

Human Processes: Unclear Resolutions

Keith Harrison Broninski discusses the recent floods in the North of England and describes how they could have been avoided had the UK government not made substantial cuts to its flood prevention programs. Keith examines the opaque collaborative decision-making process that does not always lead to maximum advantage for citizens and calls for more transparent processes in the public sector.

Human Processes: Turning Down the Heat of Collaboration

In his Column this month, Keith Harrison-Broninski discusses the secret to removing friction from workplace collaboration. He suggests that managers can eliminate friction by employing the 5 Cs—Commit, Contribute, Compensate, Calculate and Change to ensure that staff are not threatening each other’s workplace goals. Read Keith’s Column to see how the 5 Cs can help you and your organization.

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